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Watch the video: Extraterrestrial spectacle – supermassive black holes could collide in three years.

A rare sight: two supermassive black holes may collide in the galaxy SDSS J1430+2303. According to researchers, the massive objects at the center of the galaxy could collide within three years.
A rare sight: two supermassive black holes may collide in the galaxy SDSS J1430+2303.
According to researchers, the massive objects at the center of the galaxy could collide within three years.
Similar events have already been observed in the past. Until now, however, observations have been limited to black holes with simple stellar masses.
The reason: The LIGO and Viro gravitational wave detectors are designed for these masses. For heavier objects, the resulting gravitational waves have a frequency too low for current detectors to measure.
The potentially colliding objects at the center of the galaxy together weigh about the same as 200 million suns, making them too massive to measure.
Although recurring vibrations and X-ray measurements indicate that the two very massive celestial bodies are supermassive black holes, there is no 100 percent certainty.
While objects took a year to spin 3 years ago, now they only need a month.
A collision is likely to release a wide variety of measurable radiation. The researchers hope this will provide more insight into the formation of supermassive black holes.

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